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Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

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Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby WapitiTalk1 » 01 13, 2013 •  [Post 1]

Calling, stalking, equipment, bivy camps, packing list gott have, survival, navigation, etc. Please share a tip that has worked for you in the elk woods. Big or small, let's hear them.

I'll start. I carry two contractor grade black plastic sacks in my pack (and have for many years). In a pinch, they can actually provide shelter for the night if needed. They can line your pack so the meat bags don't leak through. They provide impromtu "waders" when you can't find a log to crawl across a raging stream and don't want to soak your boots/pants.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby T/H » 01 14, 2013 •  [Post 2]

Take a backup for essential gear. I ran into a guy who had lost his release while hunting this year. I just happened to have an extra in my pack I was able to loan him. He was very thankful :) and I was glad to help him out.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby LckyTylr » 01 14, 2013 •  [Post 3]

Gotta-Have List

You spend months and months perfecting your "Gotta-Have List" and gathering all of your gear that made the cut . . . it's all squared away and you are as light as possible. You get to the Trailhead, load up and hike in 4 miles to Spike Camp. Then you realize that, while all of your "Gotta-Have's" made it to the list, not all of them made it INTO your pack. I have left my binos in my truck TWICE this last season as I had them in my pack, but during the drive to the TH, I stopped to look at game and pulled them out of my pack.

Take your Gotta-Have List with you and run through it one more time BEFORE you leave your truck.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby WapitiTalk1 » 01 14, 2013 •  [Post 4]

Some kind of an alarm clock to roust you out of that deep woods, I've hiked my arse off for almost a week, elk hunting slumber..... watch, small wind up, etc. Bring one or after 5 days of ball busting early mornings/late nights, you will sleep in.. ;)

Come on elk hunters......buglmin, swede, elkaholic, cnelk, >>>---WW--->, easeup, Theelkhunter, foxvalley, Goatboy, pointysicks, POK, Herb, flystrait, ceetoo, etc. Share your tips.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby Heartwood » 01 14, 2013 •  [Post 5]

I often use my grouse arrow (with head and nock removed) as a small pipe to get water out of high country seeps and springs when the water is just a trickle. This, at times, saves time and energy by not having to loose elevation to go get water at bigger sources.
Bivy sack works as a meat bag if need be in a pinch. Also, we have used sleeping bags as day time insulators over piles of meat that have been layed out to cool at night. One guy stays with meat while partner goes to get pack animals in some cases.
Mountian House meals aren't half bad if you just add cold water an hour before dinner and reseal package and put back in your pack. This gives it time to soak and warm up. Works good if packing ultra light and fire restrictions are in effect. Oatmeal mixed with craisins and powdered milk is good for breakfast. Take a mouthful dry and a swig of water and you have instant oatmeal by the mouthful! I know, kind of gross to some but it lightens the pack.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby foxvalley » 01 15, 2013 •  [Post 6]

On a backpack,or bivy hunt,I hate doing dishes,and I don't. I real inexpensive meal that tastes good and leaves nothing but the fork to wash,is the hormel "completes" found in every grocery store.Lots of choices for under 2 bucks.We boil water for our coffe,and throw one of these in with the boiling water,as they are sealed.After a few min.pull out the meal,pull off the top,pour your instant coffee,or cocoa and enjoy,NO MESS!! Not as light as freeze dried,but 1/4 the price,and better tasting.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby cnelk » 01 15, 2013 •  [Post 7]

The following are some items I have found very useful while archery elk hunting - but can also be used in any hunt

GPS -
Know how to use it. If hunting with friends, set all GPS units to the same setup - UTM/DD/DMS etc. This way if you need to get coordinates from them you can just enter them in your unit

Knife -
I carry a Cutco knife - a very good knife but the most useful thing about it is the orange colored handle. Hard to lose

Parachute Cord -
Worth its weight in gold - buy a spool - you will use it. I dont like green, hard to see in the woods when trying to find a length to cut

Emergency Blankets -
If you need one, a good chance you'll need 2. They are cheap and pretty tough. Use it for a ground cloth when butchering an animal

Game Bags -
I carry 2 at all times - I may start carrying 3. You can place an entire elk [quartered & deboned] in 3 game bags

Duct Tape -
Wrap some around a 2" long dowel and put in your pack. If you get a blister, cover it and it wont get worse - many other uses too

Animal Anatomy
Learn muscles and joints and where to cut. I can butcher an entire elk with just a knife, by myself in about an hour. Try the gutless method - its not hard.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby Ridgernr » 01 15, 2013 •  [Post 8]

My best Backcountry alarm: Drink lots of water the night before.
1 -- It will help keep you hydrated
2 -- It helps me sleep
3 -- You WILL wake up on time
4 -- The only down side is On time might be earlier than you want, what better way to hit the trail earlier and find bulls in the dark
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby twinkieman » 01 15, 2013 •  [Post 9]

Tough skin is a must in my pack. It weighs almost nothing, and although it burns when applied to a blister, it stays put.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby >>>---WW----> » 01 15, 2013 •  [Post 10]

Two Bic lighters. One in my pocket and one in my pack that is vacum sealed and waterproof.

Three different diaphram calls so I can make change ups and different calls when the situation warrants.
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Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby Solitude » 01 15, 2013 •  [Post 11]

Get up high and glass whenever possible, especially in new country when the elk are quiet. IMO, your kill rates will skyrocket, your legs will thank you and you will flat out see more elk which leads to a more enjoyable trip.
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Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby Moose Man » 01 15, 2013 •  [Post 12]

Whilst this one might be lame for seasoned hunters, it was beneficial to me being a first time hunter chasing mule deer solo. I'd watched videos and read numerous articles about field dressing and felt I knew it "by heart". When opening day came, I brought a little step by step paper I'd written on the gutless field dressing process.

As luck would have it, I harvested on my 3rd day. Needless to say, post shot excitement was high (understatement) and using my step by step paper definitely helped ensure I got the job done quickly and correctly.

As said, probably not needed for everyone but was valuable for me the first time.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby mattstanton » 01 15, 2013 •  [Post 13]

Dont be too timid! I have found that being aggressive pays off more often then not! Get in his face and challenge him! Even if he runs off, it is still more exciting and makes for great memories.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby cnelk » 01 15, 2013 •  [Post 14]

When setting up for a call, remove all twigs, leaves from under your knees or feet, then extend your bow in hand to see if any overhanging branches will impede your draw from the intended direction of elk

Practice a simulated calling sequence for 20+ min.at home, kneel down and see how long your legs/knees will let you do it... remember to be still.
Have cell phone handy in case you need help getting up :)
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby wapitibowman » 01 15, 2013 •  [Post 15]

1. Hunting in the high mountain desert, drink often and drink a lot.
2. High altitude + sunny skies = sunburn and fatigue, Take some scentless sunscreen.
3. Always take more food than you think you might need. You never know what will happen. Learned this the hard way this year.
4. Taking your 10 year old on a hunt is a great experience, even if you don't harvest an animal. Memories will last forever. Include children in your hunting experiences.


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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby WapitiTalk1 » 01 15, 2013 •  [Post 16]

Some outstanding tips offered here folks.. I'm never too old or stubborn to learn something new.

1. Practice your calling constantly. It's amazing how tuned in you can get a few months before season and certainly when in the heat of battle during the rut but many of us (me included) seem to stop after season for several to many months.. Practice, practice, practice.. it makes a difference for when you need to make the right sound during a particular situation effortlessly. Practice your calling in your truck on the way to work during the off season if need be.

2. Take maps for adjoining areas to where you're hunting (as discussed on another thread, the 7.5 minute USGS quad maps work nicely). You never know when you may venture a bit farther than you planned. They're cheap, light, and pay pay divedends.

3. Can't rememer if somebody mentioned it, but always have a B, C, etc. plan if you have hunters in your area and you need to move. Been there a few times.

4. Take concentrated wash soap that works for clothes, body, etc.

5. If you can swing it, do a "dry run" with all your hunting gear, even if it's in the back yard. Make sure everything you're taking to base or a backcountry hunt works.

Good stuff.. Keep em coming.
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Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby Solitude » 01 15, 2013 •  [Post 17]

A 3 oz bottle of hydrogen peroxide makes blood trailing much quicker and less stressful. For those that do not know a drop of hydrogen peroxide (even the 3% contact solution) foams white when it comes in contact with blood. Makes those tiny questionable dark reddish brown blood drops pop bright white to give you confirmation when the trailing is getting tough.

I also prefer to leave a small quarter sized piece of TP on each blood drop so I can easily spot the direction of travel of the wounded animal at a glance. TP is biodegradable unlike flagging tape.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby otcWill » 01 16, 2013 •  [Post 18]

A horse! Best elk hunting tool I've ever used. Also love my Swingblade. Best caping tool. An extra set of strings and cables is always in the truck as well. Also, I'd never pack one in, but I keep a spot light in camp if we are car camping. Spot light is awesome for night blood trails as opposed to just a flashlight and headlamps.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby Waygoner » 01 16, 2013 •  [Post 19]

Keep hunting until it gets too dark to shoot. Take a good flashlight for the hike out.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby cnelk » 01 16, 2013 •  [Post 20]

Put a small sewing kit in your gear.
Complete with a few extra buttons and dental floss for some strong thread
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby >>>---WW----> » 01 16, 2013 •  [Post 21]

Put a small bag of Fritos in your pack. Besides being a good snack, they are also an excellent fire starter. Lite one up sometime. You'll see what I mean!

Those solar driveway lights are great to have around camp or in your tent.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby cnelk » 01 16, 2013 •  [Post 22]

I strap a small watch on my bow riser.
This way I can monitor the time on a call set, or time between bugles, etc without moving my arm to look at my wrist watch which i also have on
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby wapitibowman » 01 16, 2013 •  [Post 23]

I carry a small bottle of super glue - for cuts, scrapes, gashes, etc. It is waterproof, much better than a bandaid, and I think carries some antibacterial properties.

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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby Lefty » 01 18, 2013 •  [Post 24]

As soon as your home or back to camp get all of your gear ready for the next hunt.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby RockChucker30 » 01 18, 2013 •  [Post 25]

A very neat little fire kit that I wrote a how to on:

http://seekoutside.com/giant-pixy-stix- ... toids-tin/

It weighs 4 ounces, is cheap, and it is all-weather.

Other tips:

1. If you're from the southeast and used to 80%+ humidity then take a bottle of saline nose spray with you to CO. I had nosebleeds every day from the dry air.

2. Camp near water. I drank 6 liters per day on average, again due to dry air and altitude.

3. Go ultralight. Few things are actual necessities, and many things are taken to make you feel "safe". When in reality you're 3 miles from the truck...if you get cold and wet just walk out and turn on the heater.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby RockChucker30 » 01 18, 2013 •  [Post 26]

Another one......if you're not going to learn the full elk language, at least learn a basic cow mew and the nervous grunt. The nervous grunt will stop a bull in his tracks, giving you a chance for a shot.

It worked for me this year, and I wouldn't have gotten a shot without using it because he was moving fast and the shooting lane was narrow.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby Haulin'Quarters » 01 19, 2013 •  [Post 27]

1. Cotton balls covered in Vaseline
2. extra batteries (mainly for head lamp and flashlight) I always like to have 2 sources of light
3. I carry my Thermalite z pad on my pack so I can use it as a seat for glassing
4. patience
5. Don't forget to take pictures ( or forget the camera....oops)
6. Pace yourself, don't burn out early so you are lying around sore and not hunting
7. +1 on the para cord
8. Water tablets in case your purifier craps out on you
9. Stay hydrated
10. Enjoy your hunt
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby cnelk » 01 19, 2013 •  [Post 28]

stuff some newspapers in wet boots to dry them out.
The dry paper absorbs the moisture
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby Coveyleader » 01 19, 2013 •  [Post 29]

Don't trust anyone with your elk spots. It will come back to haunt you.

If you're sitting a wallow and have a bull out of range just passing by, throw those big flat rocks into the wallow and get ready.

Don't trust anyone with your elk spots. If you show them, be prepared to see other people at some point in your life.

If you get busted by elk, that is you've walked into them and they're looking at you. Slowly turn your back to them, and start breaking branches and pulling leaves off the saplings and "Feed Your Way" to cover. This has saved me a few times.

Don't trust anyone with your elk spots. It will come back to haunt you.

Bowhunting used to be the best season......... If you really want to kill an elk, and want the woods to yourself, try 1st season Elk in CO. I might just give up Archery!

Oh, and last but not least............... DON'T TRUST ANYONE WITH YOUR ELK SPOTS.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby WapitiTalk1 » 01 19, 2013 •  [Post 30]

You're offering genuine pearls here gentlemen.. Very, very good stuff.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby otcWill » 01 20, 2013 •  [Post 31]

When you think you're in good enough shape to chase elk in the Rocky Mountains, you are not even close!
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby foxvalley » 01 20, 2013 •  [Post 32]

Use the hogbacks as highways,getting to and from ereas,but as a general rule, the elk are not at the top,and they are not at the bottom,they are somewhere in the middle.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby wapitibowman » 01 20, 2013 •  [Post 33]

Follow through on your shot. No peeking . . .

Buy some of the water flavoring stuff (Crystal Light, etc.). They come in small packets, taste great, and are light. A refreshing treat with a mountainhouse meal at night after a really long day of hunting/packing.

When setting up on a bull as the shooter, nock one arrow and place another one next to you. I have been able to get a second shot several times at animals. The arrow is ready for you and you won't make noise trying to wrestle it out of your quiver.

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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby foxvalley » 01 22, 2013 •  [Post 34]

I don't want to sound like a broken record here, but I think the most important thing a person can do especially someone new to elk hunting, is MEMORIZE the elknut play book. The single most important factor during an encounter,is understanding what the elk is saying instantly,and reacting instantly. Action/reaction. Agressive action kills bulls. I have dreams (nightmares) about all the bulls I had so close, and didn't kill them because ...
1.I didn't understand the language
2.I was to passive(Let him come to me)
These two things alone saved dozens of bulls lives.
Newbes to elk hunting:Don't spend all your time looking at new gear that you want to buy,spend it on the playbook.You should be able to watch any elk hunting video,and know what the elk is saying,and how to react to it.
There was someone that was unsuccessful last year,came back and posted that maybe they should get the playbook now.....Really??????
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby Swede » 01 22, 2013 •  [Post 35]

Never give up the hunt. Keep on hunting as much as you can for as long as you can. This may seem like a no brainer, and I know every successful old timer on this forum will agree, but many times I have killed my elk right after everyone else gave up and went home. I even learned a few things with my extra time in the field. I have killed elk during the last hour of the last day. The last day is often the best, but there is just no tomorrow.

For many years my fire starter has been just some good dry matches and a candle.

Even if you think your shot is lethal, but the elk is still standing and presents a second shot opportunity; give it to him.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby cnelk » 01 22, 2013 •  [Post 36]

Never ever pass on an elk the first day if you would shoot it on the last day...
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby stykbow67 » 01 22, 2013 •  [Post 37]

Very good thread! The only thing I could add is instead of wrapping D-tape around a dowel, wrap it around a Bic lighter!
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby stringunner » 01 22, 2013 •  [Post 38]

approach every morning, every set up, every "walk" with the utmost confidence of killing an elk. carelessness leads to blown opportunities.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby WapitiTalk1 » 01 22, 2013 •  [Post 39]

stringunner wrote:approach every morning, every set up, every "walk" with the utmost confidence of killing an elk. carelessness leads to blown opportunities.


Wisdom right there. Each hunt, set up, calling sequence is "the one".. To forget this is fodder for almost got it done stories.. Believe me, I know..
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby foxvalley » 01 23, 2013 •  [Post 40]

[quote="Swede"]Never give up the hunt. Keep on hunting as much as you can for as long as you can.



Tired,sore,freezing,sweating,fustrated,in the middle of nowhere,living in a tiny tent,you will want to go home before the hunt is supposed to end.This is where you will find out what you are truly made of.If you have time,take a day off,regroup,relax do laundry,whatever,but don't ever give up before your time is up.Easy to say,very,very hard to do. Pull up the big boy pants,and tough it out till the last min. If you don't..... you will regret it every day for a whole year.If you hunt till the bitter end,you will know you did everything you could,and there will be no regret.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby elkmtngear » 01 23, 2013 •  [Post 41]

Always be conscious of the wind, if you have to circle a half mile to get the wind right on an approach, so be it! Get to know how the wind behaves at different times of day, in the drainages you hunt. Know that an approaching bull will try to manipulate his approach to eventually get the wind of the caller, or decoy guy.

Oh, and did I mention "wind"?
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby Da White Shoe » 01 23, 2013 •  [Post 42]

"Bone-sour"... (rotting from the inside out), can occur if quarters of meat aren't cooled right down to the bone fast enough. Normally, it only takes one night to cool the quarters enough to not have to worry about it.
It can be pretty hot on September days in the mountains, but on those hunts where it's warm at night too, here's a very good trick for cooling elk quarters very quickly.

Keep 4 un-scented trash compactor bags with you in your pack. You do not want the scented ones for obvious reasons. Compactor bags are much thicker and tougher than regular garbage bags.
Put your elk quarters in the bags and tie them to branches, trees or brush in such a way as they can sit in a stream without tipping over. It should only take 1/2 hour to an hour to cool them completely.
Some moisture will condensate inside the bags, so make sure you dry the quarters completely after you take them out of the plastic and before you put them in your game bags.

After that, with the quarters completely chilled to the bone, they'll last a very long time... even in hot weather, but...
1. you must keep them out of direct sunlight,
2. on warm days, keep them on the ground, wrapped in a tarp.
3. hang them up at night.

Remember... cool, clean and dry are keys. If your elk quarters are becoming slimy to the touch on the outside, they are on the verge of spoilage.
Spraying them with a citric acid solution will solve this problem in a hurry. It kills the surface bacteria on contact. It comes in a light-weight powder and you just mix a small amount with water.
Use a small spray bottle and spray the entire quarter and let it dry. Flys, bees and other insects are chemically burned by it and won't even land on the meat after it's been sprayed.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby Da White Shoe » 01 23, 2013 •  [Post 43]

Always carry an extra pair of socks. Changing them out during a break can really give you a boost. If they're both made of light wool, air dry them during a break and you can switch back and forth during the day. They won't even stink!

Camo on your hands is as important as having it on your face, but I like to shoot without gloves anytime I can... and September elk hunting can be hot. Camo make-up rubs off too fast on my hands. I started using cheap camo net gloves, but they are too slippery when trying to nock an arrow quickly. To solve this, I take a scissors and completely cut out the palm of my bow hand, plus the thumb and trigger finger on both hands. It's like not having any gloves on at all... but they're camouflaged.

Never call directly toward the elk you want to call in... unless it is to stop him for the shot. Otherwise, you will most likely be looking at an elk coming straight at you. If you can misdirect an elk by even 5 yards, it will help you kill him. Throwing the call to the side works!

With cow sounds, you can call at about 1/2 the volume that you think you need. They will hear you, believe me! Not only that, but it will sound much more natural in the woods.

Anytime the animal is moving toward you... shut up!
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby cnelk » 01 23, 2013 •  [Post 44]

trim your toe nails at least 10 days prior to your hunt
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby mongopino915 » 01 23, 2013 •  [Post 45]

Be very quiet when on the move, call less, wait longer, and wait some more.

A couple of cows traveling through the wood do not wake the entire mountain, neither should you.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby easeup » 01 24, 2013 •  [Post 46]

baby wipes......nuff said
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby foxvalley » 01 24, 2013 •  [Post 47]

Da White Shoe ......... Where'd you come from??? Where ever it was..... WELCOME!!!!! Great stuff,good info,WOW! citric acid,trash compactor bags, bone souring.Keep it coming!!!!

We haven't talked to much about bone souring,it's one of the most heartwenching things to see.How can you tell? Youv'e packed this elk qtr.miles out of the mtns.,get it home and start cutting it up. Guess what color the meat is around and next to the bone..........green!
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby Da White Shoe » 01 24, 2013 •  [Post 48]

foxvalley wrote:Da White Shoe ......... Where'd you come from??? Where ever it was..... WELCOME!!!!! Great stuff,good info,WOW! citric acid,trash compactor bags, bone souring.Keep it coming!!!!

We haven't talked to much about bone souring,it's one of the most heartwenching things to see.How can you tell? Youv'e packed this elk qtr.miles out of the mtns.,get it home and start cutting it up. Guess what color the meat is around and next to the bone..........green!



Having a meat thermometer in camp on extended hunts is a good idea. It'll tell you... for sure, if there's any potential problem brewing.
If the inner temp reaches anything above 40, another creek-dip in the compactor bag is called for.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby BowKill » 01 24, 2013 •  [Post 49]

This year I purchased a small chest freezer on Craigslist for $50.00. I then bought a Marine Battery, inverter and a solar panel. Works for days especially if you load it up with frozen water bottles. If you are parked at a trail head and pack meat back to the truck you can be confident that you can keep your meat cool.

I prefer to always debone the quarters completely to help reduce pack weight.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby Da White Shoe » 01 24, 2013 •  [Post 50]

We built a plywood meat box and glued in 2" Styrofoam sheeting to insulate it.
It'll last a long time with a little dry ice.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby foxvalley » 01 25, 2013 •  [Post 51]

Da White,
Can you tell me a little more about the powdered citric acid? Where can you get it,is it more effective than chili,cyanne pepper, and the acid/water ratio to be effective.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby cnelk » 01 25, 2013 •  [Post 52]

Larry Bartlett up in Alaska has some good info of this...
if you every consider going up there hunting, give him a call.
Nice guy.

http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/magazi ... c_acid.htm
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby >>>---WW----> » 01 25, 2013 •  [Post 53]

Take a piece of Sham-Wow with you. It is reusable and can be used for anything from taking a wipe down bath to gathering the morning dew off of the grass if you fun short on water.
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby Da White Shoe » 01 25, 2013 •  [Post 54]

foxvalley wrote:Da White,
Can you tell me a little more about the powdered citric acid? Where can you get it,is it more effective than chili,cyanne pepper, and the acid/water ratio to be effective.



Here you go... http://www.indianvalleymeats.com/gamesaver.htm
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby planebow » 01 26, 2013 •  [Post 55]

BowKill wrote:This year I purchased a small chest freezer on Craigslist for $50.00. I then bought a Marine Battery, inverter and a solar panel. Works for days especially if you load it up with frozen water bottles. If you are parked at a trail head and pack meat back to the truck you can be confident that you can keep your meat cool.

I prefer to always debone the quarters completely to help reduce pack weight.


How big is your inverter? I take a freezer in my cargo trailer along with a generator. Have to have a least a 800 watt in order to start the freezer. I also almost fill with with froozen milk jugs and run the generator for about an hour each night and still have lots of ice left after 2 weeks
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby BowKill » 01 27, 2013 •  [Post 56]

The inverter is 2300watt
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Re: Share a Tip, Episode 1. :)

Postby Da White Shoe » 02 03, 2013 •  [Post 57]

I've never had a huge problem with altitude sickness but, every year, it never fails to hinder my camp building and elk hunting efforts for the first few days. I get out of breath easily and have to sit down too often. Sometimes, headaches at night.

My brothers' wife owns a health food store or he wouldn't have thought to try this.

For the last 3 years, we've each been slamming 6 or 8 herbal immune stimulators, every morning and every night once we get up to camp at 10,000 feet. We only do it for the first 3 or 4 days... just to get over the hump.

The effects of the altitude, for me, have went down by 90%.
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